bookcat: (Default)
[personal profile] bookcat
here are two incredibly rambling comments I have left on blogs this evening, both of which in a roundabout way address issues of television and fandom:

On The Perks of Being Adapted into a Film at Thought Catalog:

It's not just with marginalized groups, necessarily--look at the way nerdy Americans react when the US adapts British TV, or the way Comic Book People react to pretty much any comic book news. It's partially because whenever people like things that aren't mainstream popular, they become a member of a different "ingroup" called "people who are cool enough to agree with me on this thing," because we're social creatures and need to feel like part of some sort of pack, and obviously our pack is "better" because we're in it. It extends to the atmosphere of online fandom--low-rated shows (which generally stay on the air because of they have critical acclaim or award nominations, so tha might be a mitigating factor) feel like awesome houseparties (i.e. Community), whereas the fans of hugely popular shows (Glee) feel like nightclubs, where there are way too many people and you can't hear anything but it's hypothetically still fun. (But then, there are those that prefer nightclubs IRL... and there are also people who watched Coupling on NBC and Desperate Housewives is still on the air...) Basically, this is what "hipster" means.

More to the point I think this movie will not go _all_ that mainstream, so there will be those like you and I who will scoff at the n00bs and be like "I read this book in the 8th grade," but those n00bs will push it on people all "Oh my god, you've never seen Perks? The book is pretty great too" and look down on their new friends the same way we do them.

On Why More Women Should Write Comedy: A Mathematical But Not Boring Study at Splitsider:

The more I think about it, the more I realize that basically they basically gender segment television into dramas for girls (lifetime, most shows with hospitals in) and comedies for boys (comedy central, adult swim). But then all the "good" dramas like Mad Men and the Wire are about hyper-masculine shit like being a violent criminal or Don Draper. Also I'm noticing that most competitive reality shows are marketed primarily at dudes (except, like, project runway) and "passive" reality shows at chicks (except, like, pawn stars). Basically what I'm saying is, I'm sick of ads for guys on all the shows I watch (but then I wouldn't be satisfied with ads for ladies either, as Target: Women taught us).

Conspiracy theories (and interior design) aside, this article was in fact inspiring and I am going to make a conscious effort to remember funny ideas I have and try to write something about them.

Date: 2011-01-27 06:00 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] avenuef.livejournal.com
If you think Mad Men is targeted toward men, you have clearly never watched the ads that AMC airs during its commercial breaks.

Also, aren't most network sitcoms geared toward women? I'm thinking of romantic comedies like How I Met Your Mother and...I can't name any other multi-camera network sitcoms, but you know, the ones in the style of Friends.

Also, Desperate Housewives is still on the air??!!

Date: 2011-01-27 06:39 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] bookcat.livejournal.com
I have indeed never watched Mad Men with commercials in, _but_ the reason I stopped watching is because it was just so uncomfortably manly, I literally felt the vaguely repulsed feeling when I smell certain dudes at the gym who have a lot of testosterone, it just made me cringe and want to leave. Very subjective experience though, so just pretend I said "Breaking Bad" instead (that has to be aimed at dudes, it's about chemistry and drugs and cancer and fatherhood, right?)

Other multi-camera network sitcoms right now: Two and a Half Men, Big Bang Theory, Better With You, Mike and Molly, Shit my Dad Says, How I Met Your Mother. Among those, I would say that Men, HIMYM, Bang, & Shit are probably aimed either neutrally or slightly towards women but with a decent amount of dudes? I might even be wrong this is not a well-researched statement. Also, not really in the style of Friends, I read an article about this too! http://splitsider.com/2011/01/the-legacy-of-friends-or-lack-thereof/ I don't necessarily agree, but I do think that Friends if made now wouldn't have nearly as much street cred/cool factor if it was multi instead of single camera, which would've changed the dynamic and ruined the show.

Date: 2011-01-27 06:56 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] avenuef.livejournal.com
A thought: without any research or statistics to back me up, I would guess that most TV shows try to err on the side of women, simply because women spend more money than men do, and there are more products to advertise to them. I mean, that's why soap operas are called soap operas -- they're vehicles for household-cleaning-product advertisements aimed at housewives. (This is also why "women's fiction" is such a blockbuster literary genre, and why mainstream literary fiction is usually geared more toward women: only women buy books!)

Date: 2011-01-27 08:48 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] bookcat.livejournal.com
so here's an even more global overview of what I am trying to get at: what I want is for tv advertisers to stop segmenting the market on man versus woman and start basing it on more sophisticated models like the internet uses; but I didn't actually say it because I know that the logical conclusion of that is that we have to give up more privacy/information and that's often something people are unhappy about, and also I don't think they have the infrastructure to, and don't know if they have the capacity to, send out different TV feeds based on any criteria other than geographic location. Maybe via satellite?

I honestly don't know what I'm talking about, but I do know that for several years comedy central played the same 3 minute girls gone wild commercial twice an hour after one am. I do not know if it still happens because I have a computer now. anyway, I found it annoying as shit.

Date: 2011-01-27 01:54 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] agnes-bean.livejournal.com
Actually, here's a thing that I think I learned once: Advertisers LOVE the young men 18-34 group. TV stations long to find programs that do well in that demo. They try and try and try, but they keep only succeeding with sports.

So, I don't really know quite how that relates to this convo, but interesting fact.

January 2015

S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728 293031

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 27th, 2017 08:44 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios